Posts tagged installation

by Laurie Frick 
All the good stuff happens while you sleep. If you’re sick, you heal. You build procedural memory, grow taller, resolve conflict, reorder and organize all long-term memory. Recently I’ve learned you dream in all stages, not just REM sleep. I’ve been measuring my nightly sleep using an EEG headband for over a year, and there is a definite pattern to the brainwaves, with much more activity than you’d imagine. It’s ragged with shorter bursts of deep sleep and REM sleep than I thought. I wake up a lot. Its apparent sleep rhythms are not so different than waking rhythms.
I’m convinced the way we unconsciously slice our time, waking and sleeping reflects the underlying structure of our mind. Capturing time-based activities is a way to reverse-engineer subtle underlying brain rhythms. Each work and installation I make is an experiment to find the exact resonant rhythm which tracks the underlying spaces and neural patterns of our mind. Not a total fantasy, this follows from an emerging theory in neuroscience.
I’ve straddled both the world of technology and visual art. Over the past several years, I’ve studied the developments in neuroscience and believe scientists will begin to unravel the mystery of how the brain uses memory to develop an instant attraction to visual objects and surroundings. Aesthetics, I believe is related to brain fluency and the desire to re-experience the familiar.
Mathematical proportions are everything. Our attraction to external pattern stem from internal neural structures in our mind. There is a human desire to find the neural mirror to ourselves, even at the most basic level — the firing pattern of hippocampal neurons.
I’m currently investigating the notion that there is a statistical pattern underlying all cognition. If you could capture the neural rhythm and replay it, in the not so far off future you will be able to replay and relive the original experience.

by Laurie Frick

All the good stuff happens while you sleep. If you’re sick, you heal. You build procedural memory, grow taller, resolve conflict, reorder and organize all long-term memory. Recently I’ve learned you dream in all stages, not just REM sleep. I’ve been measuring my nightly sleep using an EEG headband for over a year, and there is a definite pattern to the brainwaves, with much more activity than you’d imagine. It’s ragged with shorter bursts of deep sleep and REM sleep than I thought. I wake up a lot. Its apparent sleep rhythms are not so different than waking rhythms.

I’m convinced the way we unconsciously slice our time, waking and sleeping reflects the underlying structure of our mind. Capturing time-based activities is a way to reverse-engineer subtle underlying brain rhythms. Each work and installation I make is an experiment to find the exact resonant rhythm which tracks the underlying spaces and neural patterns of our mind. Not a total fantasy, this follows from an emerging theory in neuroscience.

I’ve straddled both the world of technology and visual art. Over the past several years, I’ve studied the developments in neuroscience and believe scientists will begin to unravel the mystery of how the brain uses memory to develop an instant attraction to visual objects and surroundings. Aesthetics, I believe is related to brain fluency and the desire to re-experience the familiar.

Mathematical proportions are everything. Our attraction to external pattern stem from internal neural structures in our mind. There is a human desire to find the neural mirror to ourselves, even at the most basic level — the firing pattern of hippocampal neurons.

I’m currently investigating the notion that there is a statistical pattern underlying all cognition. If you could capture the neural rhythm and replay it, in the not so far off future you will be able to replay and relive the original experience.

by Lang and Baumann
Inflated white tubes connected all windows of two floors with each other. Each tube threaded several windows in a random order. The result was a huge chaotic knot infront of the facade. In the night the lights from the inside were shining through the translucent foil.

by Lang and Baumann

Inflated white tubes connected all windows of two floors with each other. Each tube threaded several windows in a random order. The result was a huge chaotic knot infront of the facade. In the night the lights from the inside were shining through the translucent foil.

by Megan Geckler
The bulk of my work lies within the area located between art and design.  Each space in which I work informs the optical order and systematic reasoning that is the foundation for my process.   An entryway offers multiple pathways and destinations – each with their own readymade focal point, a soffit becomes the departure point of the piece and the work speaks of the architectural facet and quirks of the space.  A shipping container’s depth and repetition of indentations becomes the inspiration for a giant swirling aperture into an endless tunnel.  Upon completion, these architectural site-specific installations share the cool slick look of advertisements, backdrops for fashionable clothing, and high design products.  Made of translucent plastic, they simulate and reference our idea of “the future” and camouflage the handmade quality of the work.
The site-specific architectural installations are assembled from thousands of strands of flagging tape, a colorful plastic ribbon utilized by surveyors to demarcate space on construction sites.  This anonymous material is located on the periphery of our everyday life, manufactured in a wide array of colors and coded for multiple practical uses.   When distanced from their intended applications, this material lends a manufactured quality to the pieces. The translucency of the material has encouraged me to experiment with light in later works, designing and fabricating diffusers, or sometimes building around the florescent tubes themselves, which share the industrial territory of the flagging tape.  The tape becomes the surface and a point of departure for color studies, achieved by layering the material over itself, much like a painter would use a glaze, exponentially increasing the limited palette that is available.
There is an inherent immediacy in the materials that I use, and the manner in which they are crafted is obvious and deliberate.  Generally, a gesture is repeated over and over until the area is completed.  Large-scale installations are defined entirely by their surface, hollow on the inside, challenging the notion that sculptures have both weight and volume.  Essentially drawings in space, they bisect and alter our perception of the architecture and become seemingly kinetic as the viewer’s orientation changes.  This phenomenon occurs as a result of the combination of our sensory system with the physics of light.  Often disorientation is experienced when the stripe patterns intersect and appear to slide in opposite directions. This fascinates and delights viewers, as they frequently encourage each other to view the work from a certain direction to experience this phenomenon. The end result resembles an updated three-dimensional version of string art that shares the seemingly kinetic territory of the Op Art and Light+Space movements. These site-specific projects are also strongly influenced by minimalism, but retain a sense of play and delight.

by Megan Geckler

The bulk of my work lies within the area located between art and design.  Each space in which I work informs the optical order and systematic reasoning that is the foundation for my process.   An entryway offers multiple pathways and destinations – each with their own readymade focal point, a soffit becomes the departure point of the piece and the work speaks of the architectural facet and quirks of the space.  A shipping container’s depth and repetition of indentations becomes the inspiration for a giant swirling aperture into an endless tunnel.  Upon completion, these architectural site-specific installations share the cool slick look of advertisements, backdrops for fashionable clothing, and high design products.  Made of translucent plastic, they simulate and reference our idea of “the future” and camouflage the handmade quality of the work.

The site-specific architectural installations are assembled from thousands of strands of flagging tape, a colorful plastic ribbon utilized by surveyors to demarcate space on construction sites.  This anonymous material is located on the periphery of our everyday life, manufactured in a wide array of colors and coded for multiple practical uses.   When distanced from their intended applications, this material lends a manufactured quality to the pieces. The translucency of the material has encouraged me to experiment with light in later works, designing and fabricating diffusers, or sometimes building around the florescent tubes themselves, which share the industrial territory of the flagging tape.  The tape becomes the surface and a point of departure for color studies, achieved by layering the material over itself, much like a painter would use a glaze, exponentially increasing the limited palette that is available.

There is an inherent immediacy in the materials that I use, and the manner in which they are crafted is obvious and deliberate.  Generally, a gesture is repeated over and over until the area is completed.  Large-scale installations are defined entirely by their surface, hollow on the inside, challenging the notion that sculptures have both weight and volume.  Essentially drawings in space, they bisect and alter our perception of the architecture and become seemingly kinetic as the viewer’s orientation changes.  This phenomenon occurs as a result of the combination of our sensory system with the physics of light.  Often disorientation is experienced when the stripe patterns intersect and appear to slide in opposite directions. This fascinates and delights viewers, as they frequently encourage each other to view the work from a certain direction to experience this phenomenon. The end result resembles an updated three-dimensional version of string art that shares the seemingly kinetic territory of the Op Art and Light+Space movements. These site-specific projects are also strongly influenced by minimalism, but retain a sense of play and delight.

by onformative

An ordinary situation in a technoid world: strolling through the streets and passing enormous LED screens consisting of tiny points of light that generate an impression of reality. This reality is such a familiar and an integral part of our daily life that the viewer hardly reflects on it. What would happen if the image were to change as the viewer approached it? If the digital face suddenly became distorted? If the confines of this supposed reality were suddenly dissolved? These questions intrigued us while working on »fragments of RGB«.

This project experiments with illusion and perception on various levels. The classic LED screen as a medium was simulated and disintegrated by the creation of a pixel-like optic using simple projection rather than the entire image’s being comprised of individual points of light. If one examines the idea of perception more closely, especially individual perception – which differs from individual to individual – then a second consideration arises in regard to »fragments of RGB«.

We became interested in the observer’s personal view and in »re-projecting« this. The installation reacted to and changed with the viewer’s movement and, hence, his perspective and point of view. The illusion of a LED screen was destroyed and the RGB elements dissolved to form new, translated images and, thus, a transformed »reality«. Beside the installation that illustrates the sensitive interaction between person and image, »fragments of RGB« is also intended as a photographic series in which the transformations that occurred on the display were consciously photographed, whereby the effect of alienation was intensified in the design process.

Kate MccGwire gathers, collates, re-uses, layers, peels, burns, reveals, locates, questions, duplicates, plays with and photographs.
 Her practice probes the beauty inherent in duality, exploring the play of opposites - at an aesthetic, intellectual and visceral level - that characterises the way we conceive the world. She does this by appealing to our essential duality as human beings, to our senses and our reason, and by drawing on materials capable of embodying a dichotomous way of seeing, feeling and thinking. The finished work has a consistent ‘otherness’ to it that places it beyond our experience of the world, poised on a threshold between the parameters that define everyday reality.

Kate MccGwire gathers, collates, re-uses, layers, peels, burns, reveals, locates, questions, duplicates, plays with and photographs.


Her practice probes the beauty inherent in duality, exploring the play of opposites - at an aesthetic, intellectual and visceral level - that characterises the way we conceive the world. She does this by appealing to our essential duality as human beings, to our senses and our reason, and by drawing on materials capable of embodying a dichotomous way of seeing, feeling and thinking. The finished work has a consistent ‘otherness’ to it that places it beyond our experience of the world, poised on a threshold between the parameters that define everyday reality.

Telepresent Water

by David Bowen

This installation draws information from the intensity and movement of the water in a remote location. Wave data is being collected in real-time from National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration data buoy station 46075 Shumagin Islands Alaska (53°54’39” N 160°48’21” W). The wave intensity and frequency is scaled and transferred to the mechanical grid structure resulting in a simulation of the physical effects caused by the movement of water from this distant location.

by Sebastien Verdon
I really love the tension/attraction that is going on in this piece, would love to see this work/concept expanded upon / further explored!
He has some other really nice works as well …

by Sebastien Verdon

I really love the tension/attraction that is going on in this piece, would love to see this work/concept expanded upon / further explored!

He has some other really nice works as well …

by Joon&Jung

written by Leon Laskowski

Due to the accelerating development of science and technology and their profound impact on social life we lose track of our relations to people close to us, such as neighbours and friends. The flood of digital and commercial culture drowns the concern for and awareness of our direct living environments. Everybody knows – it is easy to say ‘We are too busy!’ – may it be a matter of fact or just an excuse – as Designers we kind of feel sorry for this state.
Refering to the ‘Rocking on the Beach’ chair, a former work of us, we at Studio Joon&Jung seek to primarily provide a natural experience yet through the moderat and subtle implementation and use of high technology.

The ‘Living Light’ is triggering the people’s attention for its light, gathering and grouping them under the same source. By detecting the human presence in relation to the space around, the ‘Living Light’ blossoms into a big flower simoultaneously increasing the amount of light, interactively welcoming the people to come together and communicate under its ambient blossom. Our algorithm for the specially programmed microchip is controlling the energy use and brightness of the light according to the presence of people, thus enabling the light to switch into energy saving mode when there is nobody around. The maximum brightness is about 1750 Lumen ( equivalent to 220V 120W incandescent light bulb ) whereas the overall energy consumption is but 15W for the ‘Living Light’.

Ivan Navarro views his work as building upon the unresolved aspects of minimalism, striving to engage viewer interaction and highlight the social and political factors that inherently lie within formal composition. Utilising the aesthetic purity of florescent light bulbs, Ivan Navarro’s White Electric Chair reveals a chilling menace in its sensitivity as a design object. Modelled as fashionable furniture, Navarro’s sculpture poses as desirable commodity; its fragility and high-voltage threat undermining the assuring and authoritative qualities of its ergnomic construction.

Ivan Navarro views his work as building upon the unresolved aspects of minimalism, striving to engage viewer interaction and highlight the social and political factors that inherently lie within formal composition. Utilising the aesthetic purity of florescent light bulbs, Ivan Navarro’s White Electric Chair reveals a chilling menace in its sensitivity as a design object. Modelled as fashionable furniture, Navarro’s sculpture poses as desirable commodity; its fragility and high-voltage threat undermining the assuring and authoritative qualities of its ergnomic construction.

by Motohiko Ondani 
Born 1972 in Kyoto. He received his BFA in sculpture and his MFA from Tokyo National University of Fine Arts and Music. 
Since appearing on the scene as one of a new generation of artists with sculptural roots, Odani Motohiko has continued to create works of monstrous beauty that excite painful sensations in the viewer.

by Motohiko Ondani 

Born 1972 in Kyoto. He received his BFA in sculpture and his MFA from Tokyo National University of Fine Arts and Music.

Since appearing on the scene as one of a new generation of artists with sculptural roots, Odani Motohiko has continued to create works of monstrous beauty that excite painful sensations in the viewer.

by Michal Maciej Bartosik
Utilizing Kenneth Snelson’s structural discovery, appropriated and popularized by Buckminster Fuller as “Tensegrity,” Bartosik proposes new possibilities of light forms, whereby the light source and its electrical wire work mutually in compression and tension to produce a seemingly discontinuous field of light defined by it structural form.
Michal Maciej Bartosik was born in Walbrzych, Poland. He studied Architecture at the University of Toronto School of Architecture and Landscape Architecture, and at the Politechnika Krakowska in Krakow. His work spans his mutual interest in Urbanism, Architecture, Art and Design.

by Michal Maciej Bartosik

Utilizing Kenneth Snelson’s structural discovery, appropriated and popularized by Buckminster Fuller as “Tensegrity,” Bartosik proposes new possibilities of light forms, whereby the light source and its electrical wire work mutually in compression and tension to produce a seemingly discontinuous field of light defined by it structural form.

Michal Maciej Bartosik was born in Walbrzych, Poland. He studied Architecture at the University of Toronto School of Architecture and Landscape Architecture, and at the Politechnika Krakowska in Krakow. His work spans his mutual interest in Urbanism, Architecture, Art and Design.

 
by Dietrich Wegner
Every society accumulates contradictions amidst their ideals. Dietrich Wegner employs those contradictions, situating opposites together in sculpture and photography that feed on the friction between two conflicting ideas. When an image stands in limbo, between associations, it occupies a flexible place in our mind. Wegner creates images that are safe and unsettling, abject and beautiful. Some of his work shows us how a mushroom cloud can resemble a tree house, an anus a vortex, a suicide bomber a vulnerable human being, all in an effort to explore our varied states of contentment and security. In other works, such as in Cumulous Brand, babies are covered in multicolored tattoos in a meditation on how our identities evolve and how we declare them.
Often Wegner chooses materials that contradict an aspect of an image while striving towards a realistic depiction of the image. A mushroom cloud is fluffy like synthetic cotton, yet a Poly-fil mushroom cloud becomes fun and cozy.  A blood splat (such as in Red Field) is shiny and exciting, yet perhaps signifying something not so fun. Both a Poly-fil playhouse and a urethane blood splat are examples of material reflecting what an image looks like and contradicting the tone of what a subject feels like or “means”.  Sometimes the material choice does not both challenge and support an image; the material may simply do one or the other. In these cases, when the material does little contradicting, the image(s) itself must create the limbo.
The ephemeral beauty of a mushroom cloud is frightening, how it floats for a minute, delicate and blooming, yet remains chaotic and utterly destructive. We experience a contradiction between what our eyes enjoy and what our mind knows. It is this conflicted experience Dietrich Wegner’s work strives to evoke in a viewer in order that we will have a sparked curiosity and unstable assumptions.

by Dietrich Wegner

Every society accumulates contradictions amidst their ideals. Dietrich Wegner employs those contradictions, situating opposites together in sculpture and photography that feed on the friction between two conflicting ideas. When an image stands in limbo, between associations, it occupies a flexible place in our mind. Wegner creates images that are safe and unsettling, abject and beautiful. Some of his work shows us how a mushroom cloud can resemble a tree house, an anus a vortex, a suicide bomber a vulnerable human being, all in an effort to explore our varied states of contentment and security. In other works, such as in Cumulous Brand, babies are covered in multicolored tattoos in a meditation on how our identities evolve and how we declare them.

Often Wegner chooses materials that contradict an aspect of an image while striving towards a realistic depiction of the image. A mushroom cloud is fluffy like synthetic cotton, yet a Poly-fil mushroom cloud becomes fun and cozy.  A blood splat (such as in Red Field) is shiny and exciting, yet perhaps signifying something not so fun. Both a Poly-fil playhouse and a urethane blood splat are examples of material reflecting what an image looks like and contradicting the tone of what a subject feels like or “means”.  Sometimes the material choice does not both challenge and support an image; the material may simply do one or the other. In these cases, when the material does little contradicting, the image(s) itself must create the limbo.

The ephemeral beauty of a mushroom cloud is frightening, how it floats for a minute, delicate and blooming, yet remains chaotic and utterly destructive. We experience a contradiction between what our eyes enjoy and what our mind knows. It is this conflicted experience Dietrich Wegner’s work strives to evoke in a viewer in order that we will have a sparked curiosity and unstable assumptions.

Calibration II is a live video installation by Kyung Woo Han. The actual installation is a distorted box, but a camera with a fish-eye lens makes it look right again.
Born in Seoul Korea, he graduated from Seoul National University with a BFA in sculpture and has an MFA in Film,Video and New Media from The School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

Calibration II is a live video installation by Kyung Woo Han. The actual installation is a distorted box, but a camera with a fish-eye lens makes it look right again.

Born in Seoul Korea, he graduated from Seoul National University with a BFA in sculpture and has an MFA in Film,Video and New Media from The School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

Motoi Yamamoto has to be the most patient man in the world. A Japanese artist, Yamamoto uses salt to create monumental floor paintings, each so absurdly detailed!
The story behind Yamamoto’s salt sculptures is sweet and sad. His sister died of brain cancer more than a decade ago. To honor her memory, he began sketching with salt — in Japan, a traditional symbol for purification and mourning. The meandering patterns are meant to convey a sense of eternity. Yamamoto takes pains to extend the metaphor beyond the walls of the art gallery. In Cologne, he invited viewers to deconstruct the labyrinth and redistribute its salt elsewhere — in the sea or the soil or wherever else it might contribute to new life. 
Written by Suzanne LaBarre

Motoi Yamamoto has to be the most patient man in the world. A Japanese artist, Yamamoto uses salt to create monumental floor paintings, each so absurdly detailed!

The story behind Yamamoto’s salt sculptures is sweet and sad. His sister died of brain cancer more than a decade ago. To honor her memory, he began sketching with salt — in Japan, a traditional symbol for purification and mourning. The meandering patterns are meant to convey a sense of eternity. Yamamoto takes pains to extend the metaphor beyond the walls of the art gallery. In Cologne, he invited viewers to deconstruct the labyrinth and redistribute its salt elsewhere — in the sea or the soil or wherever else it might contribute to new life. 

Written by Suzanne LaBarre